Aitana Lopez makes $16k a month as a model and influencer. But she doesn’t exist.

“One day, a well-known Latin American actor texted to ask her out,” Cruz shared. “He had no idea Aitana didn’t exist.”

Off the back of Aitana’s success, the company has now created a new model by the name of Maia, who they describe as “a little more shy.”

And it appears the digitised strategy is working. Cruz shared in the interview that a wave of brands are now requesting their own AI models.

“They want to have an image that is not a real person and that represents their brand values, so that there are no continuity problems if they have to fire someone or can no longer count on them,” he explained. 

Off the back of Aitana’s success, the company has now created a new model by the name of Maia, described as “a little more shy.”

And it appears the digitised strategy is working, with Cruz sharing that a wave of brands are now requesting their own personalised personas. 

What does AI mean for the future of modelling?

With this in mind, what do these kinds of advancements mean for the future of modelling? 

We asked Mamamia’s Executive Editor and model Elfy Scott, who said that while artificial intelligence undoubtedly opens up more doors for brands, it’s an area that’s layered with complexities.

“I think that AI-generated models absolutely represent an interesting opportunity for brands to showcase their products on technology that looks ‘cutting edge’ and certainly comes with lower costs and fewer complications than using human models — but it is ethically complex,” she said.